Role Strain and Its Influence on Organizational Citizenship Behavior among Faculty Staff

Supplementary Files

Role Strain and Its Influence on Organizational Citizenship Behavior among Faculty Staff

Keywords

Role strain, organizational citizenship behavior, faculty staff

How to Cite

Saad, N., & El sayed, S. (2022). Role Strain and Its Influence on Organizational Citizenship Behavior among Faculty Staff. Evidence-Based Nursing Research, 4(3), 1-8. https://doi.org/10.47104/ebnrojs3.v4i3.242

Abstract

Context: The quality of university education is highly affected by faculty staff engagement that drives them to go beyond their assigned ‎roles and job description to have Organizational Citizenship Behaviors (OCBs).

Aim: To investigate the influence of role strain on organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs) among nursing faculty staff.

Methods: This analytic cross-sectional study was carried out at the Faculty of Nursing at Ain Shams University on a convenience sample of 89 faculty members. Data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire with OCBs and role strain scales.

Results: Participants' age ranged from 25 and 53 years. 83.1% had high citizenship behaviors, and 68.5% had high role strain. The citizenship behavior and role strain scores were positively and significantly correlated (r=0.253). The multivariate analysis identified role strain score as a positive predictor of OCB score.

Conclusion: The nursing faculty staff in the study setting have high scores in OCBs and fewer scores in role strain. Their role strain positively predicts their OCBs. It is recommended to carry out a similar study with a prospective follow-up design. The roles of leadership style and job satisfaction in the relationship between role strain and OCBs need to be investigated.

https://doi.org/10.47104/ebnrojs3.v4i3.242

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