Work-Related Stressors, Coping Strategies: Its Relation to Job Performance and Perceived Organizational Support among Critical Care Nurses

Supplementary Files

Work-Related Stressors, Coping Strategies: Its Relation to Job Performance and Perceived Organizational Support among Critical Care Nurses

Keywords

Work-related stressors, coping strategies, job performance, perceived organizational support, and critical care nurses.

How to Cite

Morsy, M., & Ebraheem, S. (2020). Work-Related Stressors, Coping Strategies: Its Relation to Job Performance and Perceived Organizational Support among Critical Care Nurses. Evidence-Based Nursing Research, 2(3). https://doi.org/10.47104/ebnrojs3.v2i3.127

Abstract

Context: Work-related stressors are a world phenomenon. It results in a variety of diseases or disorders in terms of physical, psychological, and behavioral. It is commonly associated with jobs that require a lot of direct interactions with clients such as nurses that could affect nurses' job performance and cause high costs for the hospital. A problem needs a sense of support from the organization.

Aim: The present study was aimed to assess work-related stressors, coping strategies, and its relation to job performance and perceived organizational support among critical care nurses.

Methods: The study was conducted at Critical Care Units at Benha University Hospital. Subjects: All staff nurses (235) who working at Critical Care Units at Benha University Hospital.  A descriptive correlational design was utilized. Four tools were employed in this study, Work-Related Stressors Assessment Questionnaire, The Coping and Adaptation Processing Scale (CAPS), Nurses' job Performance evaluation (observational checklist), and Perceived Organizational Support Questionnaire.

Results: This study's findings indicated that nearly three-fifths (60.4%) of staff nurses had a moderate level of the work-related stressor. Also, about two-thirds (63.90%) of them had a high level of coping strategies and, about two-thirds (65.90%) of staff nurses had a moderate level of perception of organizational support and nearly half (49.80%) of nurses had a low level of performance.

Conclusions: The present study concluded that nurses reported a moderate perception level regarding work-related stressors and organizational support. While nurses reported a high level of coping strategies and a low level of job performance, there was a statistically significant negative correlation between the total score of work-related stressors and nurses' job performance. There was a statistically significant positive correlation between coping strategies and nurses' job performance. A statistically significant positive correlation was revealed between total perceived organizational support and total level of nurses' job performance. The study recommended that hospital administration organize seminars and workshops for nurses targeted at specific sources of stress like conflict resolution, workload, and time management. Efforts to improve nurses' performance must be performed, aiming to increase nurses' ability to complete tasks assigned to them through education and training.

https://doi.org/10.47104/ebnrojs3.v2i3.127

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